Buffer Blitz Workshop

posted Jun 25, 2019, 1:54 PM by Joseph Bickard

On Thursday, June 13, as the rain poured down, an engaged crowd  participated in the Buffer Blitz Workshop sponsored by the Highland Lake Association  (HLA) at the Cornerstone Church from 5 – 7 pm .   The workshop was all about empowering  homeowners to implement best practices in caring for their properties, because what goes on in the watershed properties implicitly impacts water quality in the lake. Discussion was lively during and after  a set of presentations.

 John Maclaine Non Point Source Training Center Coodinator,  Department of Environmental Protection,  led off the evening with a presentation, “Why buffers matter”   He emphasized the importance of residents doing everything that they can to restore their property to what it might have been prior to development.  Planting various types of vegetation in order to create varying levels of a canopy is an ongoing project .

Chris Brewer, Project Admininstrator at Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District encouraged folks to think about implementing “Lake Smart Practices “ on their property.  His presentation included audience participation in an exercise where folks evaluated properties as “Good, Bad or Ugly” according to how that property reflected lake smart practices. 

Then Chris Hanson, Director of the Code Enforcement Office in Windham interacted with the audience on a  number of topics ranging from “What are the rules about cutting trees in the shoreland zone?” to “Can I dig a hole to plant one item along the shoreline?”  Chris encouraged folks to see the Code Enforcement office as a resource.  “If you have a question, come see us.  Some projects require permitting, and some do not.  Use our office as a resource.”

In the final presentation of evening,  Kevin McElearney, resident on the Pride Farm Road and member of the Grant Implementation Committee presented  the process by which  residents could apply for grant money in order to assist them in mitigating erosion sites that were identified in the Watershed Survey.  Residents in the Highland Lake watershed had received letters notifying them of the erosion issues on their property.  If a resident needed assistance, financial or technical, the HLA wanted to help. 

The evening included a lot of pertinent information and also provided the opportunity for residents to interact with landscapers, municipal officials,  HLA representatives, and local agencies, regarding  questions about the best way to correct erosion issues. 

John Maclaine and Chris Brewer presentations are below. 
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Joseph Bickard,
Jun 25, 2019, 1:54 PM
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Joseph Bickard,
Jun 25, 2019, 1:54 PM
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